sweet-love-und-romance:

X photographed in London by Richard Bellia, 1988.
via

sweet-love-und-romance:

X photographed in London by Richard Bellia, 1988.


Joe Strummer photographed by Bob Gruen, 1984.

Joe Strummer photographed by Bob Gruen, 1984.

earthsbelonging:

love at its finest

theladyintweed:

4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No 20:

Highclere Castle, Hampshire, England. 

Rebuilt 1839-42 by Sir Charles Barry, with a park by Capability Brown. 

Was the home of Lord Carnarvon, friend and sponsor of Howard Carter, and is the main filming location of Downton Abbey. 

actionables:

image

IT’S THEM AS BABIES


"The PRE-JOE Years. Snapshots from the collection of Pablo Labritain: (clockwiske from left) Joe at Cuckmere Haven campsite, East Sussex, just two weeks after his brother had taken his own life; Joe gravedigging in Newport, south Wales, winter ‘73-74; Joe’s dad Ronald in the late ’60s; Joe’s mum Anne around the same time; referencing Warhol and The Who in the 6th form, 1968; letter to Pablo on the road; passport photograph circa 1973."
From Mojo Magazine (2006)

"The PRE-JOE Years. Snapshots from the collection of Pablo Labritain: (clockwiske from left) Joe at Cuckmere Haven campsite, East Sussex, just two weeks after his brother had taken his own life; Joe gravedigging in Newport, south Wales, winter ‘73-74; Joe’s dad Ronald in the late ’60s; Joe’s mum Anne around the same time; referencing Warhol and The Who in the 6th form, 1968; letter to Pablo on the road; passport photograph circa 1973."

From Mojo Magazine (2006)

After months of living hand to mouth, Jimi Hendrix and his girlfriend Kathy Etchingham moved into the ground floor of 34 Montague Square, London, at the end of 1966.  The flat’s owner, Ringo Starr, had loaned it to Chas Chandler as a favor.  This iconic session from David Magnus dates from February 1967 and shows Hendrix posing on the pavement nearby.  He is wearing a badge bearing the name of his hero, Bob Dylan.  Later in 1967 Hendrix was obliged to leave Montague Square because, Chandler claimed, unhappy neighbors invoked a clause forbidding black tenants.

Ingrid Bergman in “Casablanca” (1942)

Ingrid Bergman in “Casablanca” (1942)

lovejewelry:

Diadem with large pink diamond and smaller white diamonds - circa 1810 - most likely belonged to Elizabeth Aleksandrovna, wife of Aleksander I. 

lovejewelry:

Diadem with large pink diamond and smaller white diamonds - circa 1810 - most likely belonged to Elizabeth Aleksandrovna, wife of Aleksander I. 

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”
"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”

"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.